Canada Tour 2018

We were delighted to embark on our first international tour to Canada this summer, giving seven concerts across three Canadian provinces. Our programmes included meditative and atmospheric choral music from the renaissance to the present day, and featured works from our debut album, English Motets. Highlights included works by William Byrd and Thomas Tallis, alongside ‘O Little Rose, O Dark Rose’ by Canadian composer, Gerda Blok-Wilson, with the programme rounded off by folk song arrangements from the British Isles.

Catch up with our tour blog, with an entry written by each member of the ensemble.


This video explains a little more about our tour to Canada, and features some of the works we performed, including a beautiful piece by Canadian composer, Gerda Blok-Wilson.


CONCERT DATES

Pre-Tour UK Concerts

13 July 2018
Cambridge | The Round Church
Start time: 8:00 PM
Ticket Link

14 July 2018
London | St Clement Danes, The Strand
Start time: 6:30 PM
Ticket Link

15 July 2018
Salisbury | St Martin’s Church
Start time: 7:30 PM
Ticket Link


CANADA TOUR, 17-28 July 2018

17 July 2018
Ottawa, Music & Beyond | St Matthew’s Anglican Church
Start time: 2:00 PM
Ticket Link


18 July 2018
Québec | CAMMAC Centre
Start time: 5:00 PM
Ticket Link


20 July 2018
Victoria | Christ Church Cathedral, Chapel of the New Jerusalem
Start time: 7:30 PM
Ticket Link


21 July 2018
Vancouver | St James’ Anglican Church
Start time: 7:30 PM
Ticket Link


24 July 2018
Music Niagara | St Mark’s Church, Niagara-on-the-Lake
Start time: 7:30 PM
Ticket Link


26 July 2018
Elora Festival | St John’s Church
Start time: 7:30 PM
Ticket Link


28 July 2018
Toronto | Cathedral Church of St James
Start time: 7:30 PM
Ticket Link

Canada Tour Blog 2018

Tour Blog #6 – Owain sums up our summer

After concerts in the beautiful towns of Niagara-on-the-Lake and Elora, we were almost taken aback by the towering architecture as we approached the bustling metropolis of Toronto. A highlight of this tour has been the personal connections we have made along the way, but here was a connection already forged, in the form of our founding second tenor, Robert Busiakiewicz, who is now director of music at St James Cathedral. Having someone who knows the area so well was invaluable – Rob picked out some of his favourite sites, including an amazingly packed bookshop with a seemingly endless supply of fascinating titles. After the usual re-caffeination, we headed to the cathedral to try out some of our repertoire, with the aim of answering the perennial question of where exactly to position Sam.

Having failed in that task, we headed to an Indian restaurant a short walk from the cathedral, where we were treated to a delicious array of dishes, paired with Canadian beer and wine (and yes, Mike, it’s fine to have wine with a curry.) Naturally, the next day got off to a dozy start, but with our final performance within our sights, we courageously ploughed on and finished on a real high, with our seventh standing ovation of the tour. On our final day in Canada, Joseph visited a really big organ, Mike stayed in bed until after midday, and Josh was left behind. Miraculously, we all made it on the last WestJet flight of the day, and arrived at Gatwick the next morning, red-eyed and bushy tailed. 

Our first international tour was fantastic for so many reasons, but none more so than the wonderful people we met; those who came to concerts, and those who kindly let us stay in their homes. I knew Canada would be a great place to tour with this group, but I think the tour exceeded our expectations on all fronts – so we are looking forward to the next with great anticipation!

~ European update ~

After two weeks in Canada, we thought it would be a good idea to continue the fun, and found ourselves in the Netherlands for a concert at the Delft Chamber Music Festival. The Oude Kerk was one of the largest venues we have performed in, and it was fantastic to have a crowd of around 500 people at our concert. Our programme centred around ‘powerful love stories’, with works by Gesualdo at the fore. 

I write this, thankfully, with my suitcase now returned, but when we arrived in Świdnica both Alex and I were without our bags. So, with iPads fully charged and a new set of concert clothes duly purchased, we gave our Polish debut in St Joseph’s Church, and with that, our summer adventure was complete!

There is plenty to look forward to in the coming months, as we embark on European debuts in Kosovo, Belgium, Switzerland and Slovenia. Elsewhere, Joseph is working towards the inaugural Boxgrove Choral Festival with his choir, The Beaufort Singers, which takes place in Boxgrove Priory from 26-29 August. He has kindly programmed several of my pieces, which also feature on the first album of my choral works, released next month by Trinity College Choir on Hyperion Records. Our next performance takes place at the Ripon International Festival on 8 September. All of our future dates can be found on our Concerts page, with further information and ticket links. 


Joe Blogs… #5 about our time in Elora

The penultimate stop on our tour was the rather quaint riverside town of Elora. We were driven by the ever-delightful Al, who has taken us around Ontario in his Dodge Caravan, allowing us to relax and catch up on some much-needed sleep!
Elora is a place that several members of the group have visited before. It was particularly wonderful for Guy and Owain to remake their acquaintance with Stan & Elizabeth, their hosts from recent trips with Trinity College Choir. The whole group enjoyed two delicious meals at their quite amazing home – an old wooden cottage with modern extension – set in acres of diverse greenery and woodland a little way out of town.

The concert we gave was part of the prestigious Elora Festival, several events of which take place in a barn normally used to store road salt. Our concert took place at St John’s Anglican Church, which turned out to have a near-ideal acoustic for us. We enjoyed exploring its possibilities for processing to different spaces, something which lends particular bits of our programme an extra special aspect for both us and the audience.

I’m sure the group’s abiding memories of Elora will be two-fold. Ken, the son of Mike’s host, kindly took us out on the river in his very own punt, giving us a fascinating tour while telling us about the history of Elora. We had an amazing look at a coral reef that had been formed several millions of years ago and which contained an enormous number of fossils. Guy enjoyed sticking his hand out and tasting the rock as the punt hugged the shore…

…as well as tasting some truly excellent local produce at the Elora Brewing Company, another of our Elora highlights. Not only did we enjoy an excellent meal there on the first night, we also headed there after the concert with some wonderful members of the Elora Singers who were so welcoming and jovial. Thank you to them, and to all at the Festival for having us!
I write this from central Toronto, our final stop on this tour, and am not looking forward to leaving this country on Sunday evening. We have been welcomed so wonderfully and warmly by each and every place we visited, and it’s been a truly fulfilling discovery for me. I hope we will be back soon!


Tour blog #4 – Niagara-on-the-Lake by Josh Cooter

The second half of our tour takes place in Ontario, a province that is larger than both France and Spain combined. The first stop was the rather gorgeous Niagara-on-the-Lake, which just so happened to coincide with our first (and only) rest day of this tour. As Owain had visited this region previously he dutifully volunteered to be our travel guide.

In Canada, we’ve so far managed to travel in a variety of vehicles including planes, cars, ferries and even a canoe. Bikes would be our latest means of transportation, and led by our trusted guide we set off on our route of the local vineyards for tastings. My memory of the afternoon’s events is somewhat hazy, however personal highlights of the day would be my first experience of the local ice wines and the impromptu football match played amongst the grape vines.

The next morning we were treated to breakfast by one of our hosts at the the oldest golf course in North America, situated right on the shores of Lake Ontario. Enthused by the nearby sports, in classic G6 tradition we decided to go on a quest for somewhere to play cricket. It turns out, however, that Canadians are not as cricket mad as certain members of the group, and with the midday heat approaching we had to abandon our quest and head to a nearby café to source a well needed iced coffee and some shade before our rehearsal.

Our fifth concert venue was in St Mark’s Church, a lovely church built in 1804 which included 7 different keyboard instruments much to the delight of our keyboard enthusiasts Joseph and Sam. It also provided us once again with ample of opportunity for some more choraleography including at one point singing from both pulpits for a duet by Orlande de Lassus. We were really pleased with the turn-out and with another successful concert done we made our way back to one of our very kind hosts for a post-concert reception.

Next, we travel to the nearby town of Elora for our sixth concert, with the end of this tour sadly getting ever closer.


Tour blog #3 – Vancouver & Victoria by Mike Craddock

Arriving in Vancouver airport, we were met by our old friend, jetlag, having retreated back in time a further three hours. This meant that we were headed into town at what felt like midnight to meet our hosts. However, this did not dampen the incredibly warm welcome from PJ and co from St James’ Church, who we identified in baggage reclaim from the massive concert poster sign they were brandishing.

The next day brought with it a further journey westward; indeed, as far west as any of us have ever ventured. We got a bus to the Spirit of Vancouver ferry, a beautiful 2 hours spent criss-crossing islands in the balmy sun on placid seas. Our final destination was Victoria, and its fabulous Cathedral. Plenty of nooks and crannies for patented G6 choraleography®️, and a tremendous acoustic. Sure enough, the concert was both incredibly well attended and received, with the idyllic surroundings and friendly residents once again making us incredibly sad to leave after less than 24 hours!

Back on the ferry again the next morning, but not before GJ, OP and my host took us out for a little speedboat adventure. I was a terrible driver. Fortunately they didn’t let me at the ferry. In any case, straight from the bus depot to a rehearsal at St James’s in Vancouver, a very stylish Gilbert Scott-designed building with a similarly classy sound to it. The concert was a warm affair, but again was packed out, and it was a particular pleasure to meet Gerda Blok Wilson, and perform her piece to a hugely appreciative audience. It has been a truly wonderful discovery.

Our BC adventure comes to an end this morning, and has been far too brief. It will be nice though to have two days off, with some exciting plans being made for gastronomic adventures in Niagara-on-the Lake!


Tour Blog #2 – Our stop-off in Québec by Guy James

It’s a very great pleasure to be writing my first blog of our Canada Tour from 36,000 feet above the Great Lakes. We’re on our way to Vancouver tonight and Victoria early tomorrow, travelling between the two by ferry. Leaving the incredible Music Centre at CAMMAC on Lake MacDonald this afternoon was a wrench as we have had such a fantastic 24 hours there.

Picked up from our hotel in Ottawa in the familiar G6 tour sight of the 7-seater (albeit the capacious North American equivalent) we weren’t sure what to expect when we arrived at CAMMAC in Québec. CAMMAC is a former hunting lodge and for 8 weeks of the summer or so they host a selection of music courses with different specialities. We were greeted by the most friendly group of keen and driven musicians imaginable, and there was already quite a buzz about our performance. Settling into Counterpoint Week was a joy and the centre proved capable and generous hosts. The setting on the banks of the lake was picture perfect under clear blue skies and opportunities for swimming and some new filming locations soon crystallised and the fruits of these labours will be available very soon.

Leaving the warm waters of the lake barely half an hour before our concert, we were delighted to perform to a very appreciative audience in CAMMAC’s cool and resonant Lucy Hall. Enjoying dinner afterwards with the course attendees, it was wonderful to share our passions for music and its rich history and to learn more about the musical history and ‘set-up’ in the towns and cities of our Canadian friends. A workshop with the a cappella class in the picturesque CAMMAC boathouse followed dinner, which centred on ‘The Banquet Fugue’, a comic work about a restaurant by John Rutter. There was also a new discovery for the team in the form of a pair of Italian madrigals, featuring a cat, dog, cuckoo and an owl improvising over a figured bass. For reasons that may perhaps be apparent, as the sole participating countertenor, I was given the role of the owl.

Rising early the next morning, Mike and I went for a swift jog to the centre’s perimeter before meeting Owain for an early swim. A quick explore of the centre’s music library and shop later, we were sight-reading a motet from Mantua over cookies and coffee, before we headed corporately to put CAMMAC’s canoes to the test. Mike and I launched first, followed by the tenors. Having made it a few yards into the lake we were presented with the sight of the underside of the third canoe sinking slowly into Lake MacDonald and the further two (unnamed) group members scrabbling to recover personal belongings from the depths. That photographic evidence does not exist of this event serves only to highlight the intense will and efforts of those singers still afloat to aid their unfortunate colleagues, and should in no way be considered the result of a period of considerable mirth.

Belongings salvaged and canoe restored, the team spent a very enjoyable and relaxing morning exploring the lake and sharing stories with the course members over lunch. Well-fed and returned to the warm embrace of our trusty 7-seater stead we then headed back to Ottawa, and thence to where you now find us, bourne aloft over the Rocky Mountains.

I’m tremendously excited to visit the western seaboard of North America for the first time tonight; we have heard a lot of wonderful things about Vancouver and Victoria already and we can’t wait to explore ourselves between our two concerns over the coming two days!


Tour Blog #1 – ‘A whole lotta Ottawa’ by Sam Mitchell

We arrived bright-eyed and bushy-tailed on a warm morning at Gatwick airport, making our British farewell known in the form of a Wetherspoons breakfast. After a most comfortable flight we arrived in Halifax to make our connection to Ottawa, a further 90 minutes of travelling. Despite a small matter of the bus breaking down, we soon made it to our hotel, where we were pleasantly surprised to find what can only be described as spacious suites – most of which dwarfed our own flats back home! After some R and R, our stomachs needed filling and Mike led us to Fraser Cafe – a restaurant which certainly did not disappoint with its eclectic menu and excellent wine – proving to be a great distraction for the oncoming jet lag.

Still getting used to the time differential, the next morning some of us rose early and enjoyed some swimming in the hotel pool before exploring the incredibly friendly city of Ottawa, primarily in search of breakfast. After fuelling up, it was time to meet for rehearsal in the very spacious (and very warm) church of St Matthew in the Glebe district. After a sweltering concert, we were grateful to welcome some incredibly refreshing Margaritas before heading for a feast in a heavily hip-hop themed restaurant. Later that evening, we paid a visit to the Canadian parliament and its historic ‘Northern Lights’ Lumiere display, which provided a perfect cultural end to the evening before we head off to neighbouring Québec. 

Ottawa has been the perfect start to this exciting tour – the people are incredibly friendly and welcoming and I for one can’t wait to visit again one day soon.

A look back on our second Spring Tour

Mike Craddock writes about our second Spring Tour, which took place 2–8 April 2018.

Summer has firmly arrived in the City of London, and I am writing this update in a roof garden near Fleet Street, with a large iced coffee. It is amazing to think that our Spring Tour, with its associated jumpers, wellies and copious precipitation, concluded less than two weeks ago! We spent seven days in a seven-seater crisscrossing the bottom half of the country, giving seven concerts, and launching our first CD, English Motets.

We started our tour in the beautiful Black Mountains, on the Welsh border in Herefordshire. Keener followers of the group will recall that we have spent quite a bit of time in this picturesque corner of the world over the past few years, and indeed we are indebted to the Revd. Nicholas Lowton for taking time out of his busy TV schedule (star of BBC Two’s ‘A Vicar’s Life’) to put on two concerts in the area for us, in Dorstone and Clodock. Coming back to Herefordshire is always a delight, and we are only sad that inclement weather prevented us from staging our third G6 1sts v 2nds cricket match at Michaelchurch-Esley CC; always a hotly contested fixture.

Our next port of call was Bristol, the Park homestead, and a concert in All Saint’s Clifton, a building with a fabulous acoustic, celebrating its 150th Anniversary this year. As is our wont, we fully tested the auditory experience in the venue by singing our first half from every possible nook and cranny. We had the pleasure of performing one of our favourite entries from our 2016 Composition Competition, “A Birthday” by Sarah Rimkus, with the composer in the audience. We managed not to spoil the result of the Champions League game for any of our Kopites in the group, and retired chez Park to watch the highlights of the drubbing Liverpool gave Manchester City.

From Bristol we then headed to our westernmost destination, Colyton in Devon. Our concert in St Andrew’s was incredibly well attended, thanks to the herculean efforts of Margaret Clark, back in the saddle for one last ‘Concert at Colyton’ after her retirement. The next morning included a trip to the waterfront at Seaton, with the associated seaside pastimes of pebble skimming, amusement arcades, and being buffeted by unreasonably strong winds.

Back in the van and off to Winchester, where we engaged in a first tenor transfer, saying goodbye to Gopal and hello to Joseph, who joined us from what looked like a thoroughly strenuous tour in the Scilly Isles with Truro Cathedral Choir. Naturally we worked him hard that night, as he had to get through all the remaining Domino’s pizza which we ordered as vital pre-concert sustenance. Cricket that day was hard fought and high quality, after a slightly abortive attempt at the damp sports field(/bog) in Colyton. The starring cameo was from A. Chance, who retired out after a lofted off side six into the Subaru parked on the adjacent road.

One of the real highlights of the tour was our concert on Saturday afternoon, the official launch of our CD at St Peter’s Eaton Square. It was a wonderful feeling performing the repertoire we enjoyed putting down on disc to a packed church, full of supporters, colleagues and friends of the group old and new. Tallis’s “Suscipe Quaeso Domine” was particularly enjoyable to revisit in a concert setting, and there are few finer places to sing Renaissance music in London than St. Peter’s. Mercifully the sun came out for some Chapel Down sparkling wine on the portico, and we had a great time catching up with everyone after the concert.

Our final concert of the tour was a trip to beautiful Framlingham, which despite the distinctly shoddy weather remained an amazing venue. St Michael’s Church was a great place to round off the week, and appropriately for the launch tour for our first disc, was where we sold out of our first batch of CDs. This seemed a remote possibility when loading them into the car at the start of the week, but the interest and enthusiasm showed in the music has been wonderful for us, and we are so glad to be able to give audiences something to take away with them. Here’s to the first of many CD launch tours!

Spring Tour 2018

We are delighted to present our second Spring Tour, a series of concerts taking place during the first week of April. We will be touring a programme featuring works from our debut album, English Motets.

CONCERT DATES

2 April 2018
Dorstone (Herefordshire)
St Faith’s Church
Start time: 7:30 PM
Ticket Link


3 April 2018
Clodock (Herefordshire)
St Clydawg’s Church
Start time: 7:30 PM
Ticket Link


4 April 2018
Bristol
All Saint’s Church, Clifton
Start time: 7:30 PM
Ticket Link


5 April 2018
Colyton (Devon)
St Andrew’s Church
Start time: 7:30 PM
Ticket Link
in advance from The Little Shop | phone 01297 553238 | on the door


6 April 2018
Holy Trinity Church, Winchester
Start time: 7:30 PM
Ticket Link


7 April 2018
London
St Peter’s Eaton Square (CD Launch event)
Start time: 3:00 PM
Ticket Link


8 April 2018
Framlingham (Suffolk)
St Michael’s Church
Start time: 3:00 PM
Ticket Link


Concert programmes can be found on Classical Events.

Summer Tour 2017 in Review

As autumn gathers around us we thought it would be a good time to think back to the summer and share some thoughts and thank-yous from our third Summer Tour.

We kicked off with a live appearance on BBC Radio 3’s In Tune. Our third visit to W1A got off to a glittering start when we realised they were filming for Strictly Come Dancing right in front of the famous façade! With Josh still air-bourne on the way back from Australia it was a real pleasure to welcome Gopal Kambo for his first performance with the group. Gopal is a choral scholar at St John’s College in Cambridge and so is very used to singing with Joseph and although we threw him in at the deep end by performing some difficult repertoire live on Radio 3, he did a fantastic job.

With Josh restored to England, the next day we travelled to Cambridge, with Owain picking up the now familiar 7-seater rented car on the way. It’s always special for the group to return to our spiritual home in Trinity College Chapel. We last performed in the chapel in May 2015 and it was wonderful to be able to perform in the space again, and see some familiar faces in the audience. We hosted a small gathering in The Mitre, one of the local pubs afterwards to catch up with some of the audience, many of whom have been following the group since its inception. The next morning, a mercifully relaxed start allowed us to enjoy a long brunch in team-favourite Hot Numbers Cafe.

Soon after, we arrived North Luffenham in Rutland for the second concert of the tour. The town is home to the beautiful St John the Baptist church. It was a happy return to the church for Owain, who had performed there earlier this year with the Cambridge Fundraising Choir. An immensely successful dinner with our home-stays in the local Fox Inn followed our concert, and again allowed us to thank in-person some of the local musicians and friends whose hard work helped us put on the concert.

Mike and Guy’s host emerged to be a great cricket fan, and head groundsman for the adjacent cricket pitch so a plan was quickly hatched play the next morning in bright sunlight. Alex Chance’s huge six into a neighbouring garden from one of Guy’s less-pitched deliveries would make the highlights, as would his catch to dismiss Owain from one of Guy’s better balls to leave the 1st’s three runs adrift of the 2nd’s total.

With the roof-rack packed and various baggage and headphones retrieved from the pub, we were ready to press on to Northampton for our third concert in All Saints’ Church. We were warmly received by the local vicar and Jem Lowther, in whose beautiful country house we were fortunate to stay following the concert. All Saints’ was a lovely setting for Owain’s ‘A Sequence in Parenthesis’, which sets a medley of tunes from a memoire about the great war and features Sam in the unusual role of narrator. Always a very emotional piece to be involved with, it struck a particular chord with the audience in Northampton.

The fourth day of our summer tour started with a quick tour around the grounds of Jem’s family home in more lovely sunlight. Guy was particularly excited to learn that scenes from the somewhat infamous ‘Biggles’ movie were shot in the mews in the 80s. With a long journey ahead we set off to Hampshire and another church for All Saints in Odiham. The local parish obviously value music highly and have gone to great lengths to make the church an effective concert hall. We were pleased to be able to explore using various different acoustics during our concert and in celebration, Joseph was let loose on the new organ in the church as an impromptu encore for those who had stayed behind to lend a hand with staging.

The penultimate concert in our 2017 Summer Tour was in Bristol, at the huge and resonant church of St. Mary, Redcliffe, where Owain spent his formative years as a chorister. None of us shall soon forget starting the concert from the back of the church with Ego Flos Campi by Clemens non Papa, and then processing to the front of the church through the plainchant of Tallis’s Loquebantur. Renaissance polyphony is one of our favourite genres of music to sing, either in concert, in services or simply in rehearsals, and Lobo’s sublime Versa Est in Luctum made a perfect triptych for us to remember lush acoustics for the concert in Bristol. This was also Joseph’s last concert of the tour with us as he had to start his duties at Truro Cathedral the next day.

Rejoined by the unflappable Gopal the next day and refreshed by some more yard-cricket near Owain’s house, we set off to complete our little pilgrimage to St. James in Dursley, where Guy was a chorister. Delicious stew (well remembered by Michael Craddock from our tour in 2015!) met us in the Cotswold market town, at Guy’s family house and he was especially pleased to see a packed church of musicians and supporters enjoying the last concert of our 2017 Summer Tour. Complimentary pilgrimages to the local Old Spot pub and Dil Raj restaurant complete, the familiar 7-seater could be seen whizzing seven very tired but elated young men back to London through the September rain.

We’d like to once again thank enormously everyone who worked so hard to help us make our third Summer Tour such a success. It’s hard to think back to how far the group has come since our first tour in 2015 and it’s been very much aided by the dedication of our supporters and the enthusiasm for music wherever we go. Here’s to the next one!

Owain interviewed by Classical Events

Leading up to the group’s third Summer Tour, Classical Events interviewed Owain covering everything from the early days to our most memorable performances. Read the full interview here.

Interviewer: What are your most memorable performances?
Owain: Performing Arvo Pärt’s ‘Passio’ with the composer in attendance will live long in the memory, as will our first concert in Germany, which was standing-room only – a surprise to us given as the concert kicked off at 10.30pm! We really enjoy bringing our music to rural venues in the U.K. and have sung in some beautiful places, including Clodock and Dore Abbey on our first two Summer Tours. Singing Gesualdo’s Tenebrae Responsories in King’s College Chapel and performing Italian Madrigals in a room full of paintings by Caravaggio in the National Gallery are two of my personal favourites, but I also can’t forget the numerous cricket matches we’ve managed to play – that really is something the group can always agree on!

A look back at our 2017 Spring Season

Guy James reflects on our first concerts in the North of England, CD recording and performance at the SJSS Holy Week Festival 2017.

An early start heralded the beginning of our Spring projects, with me meeting Owain, Joseph, and the familiar rented 7-seater just outside Cambridge on Sunday morning. Engineering works on the Great Western Railway, a hasty U-turn and three hours of driving later saw more of us than we were expecting arriving together in the car in Monmouth for a concert as part of Wye Valley Music’s 2016/17 season. Our programme spanned the whole range of our repertoire, featuring several pieces that would be recorded later in the week! The church and Monmouthshire were stunning and we really enjoyed performing there and seeing some familiar faces in the audience, many of whom had travelled down from Herefordshire. Being one of the members of the group who suffers from standing at a normal height, I then found myself in the familiar position of being pressed up against Josh and our luggage in the back of the car for the drive back to Cambridge to begin our much-anticipated recording in the beautifully sunny Trinity College.

We were very happy to be recording some of our very favourite repertoire, that of the English Renaissance Masters. The whole group have grown up singing and loving the works of such composers as William Byrd, Thomas Tallis, John Sheppard and Orlando Gibbons and it was a real privilege to be able to work intensely on their music with Adrian Peacock and David Hinitt in Trinity College Chapel where we gave our first concert over three years ago. This work completed we headed off to further our first ever Spring Tour with a concert in Kingston Parish Church on one of the most beautiful days of the year, preceded by tea and croquet kindly provided by our very generous hosts.

The following days saw our tour continue, for the first time headed northwards! One of several highlights for me included working with the brilliant Blackburn Cathedral choristers on Allegri’s Miserere as part of a concert featuring highlights from our tour repertoire. The cathedral is a wonderful modern building, perfect for some of our more ethereal pieces and I particularly enjoyed performing Lukaszewski’s Recessit Pastor Noster alongside two of Bach’s Passiontide Chorales in the warm acoustic. The next day brought a further personal highlight, a day in Bolton alongside the energetic and inspiring Bolton Music Service, enjoying performances by many local amateur choirs and ensembles before a workshop with the gathered company and a short performance by ourselves. It was marvellous to see local live music making in such rude health and to see so many people brought together by music and performance supporting each other. Long may this ethos and such friendships flourish.

The next week we concluded our spring projects with a return to St John’s Smith Square for their inaugural Holy Week Festival alongside Tenebrae and several of our other favourite artists. Our concert featured several modern pieces including the London Premiere of Owain Park’s Sequence: ‘In Parenthesis’. Requiring the unusual forces of 5 voices and a narrator I have had the opportunity to listen to this piece several times in churches across England and it has quickly become one of my favourite pieces in our repertoire. It was a perfect conclusion to our spring projects to hear it performed in London for the first time alongside Thomas Tallis’s Lamentations of Jeremiah in a very moving exploration of loss and lament for Holy Week.


Josh Cooter writes about Arvo Pärt’s Passio

We were incredibly honoured to be asked to continue our connection with St John’s Smith Square to perform Arvo Part’s ‘Passio’ in the opening concert of London’s International A Cappella Choral Competition on the 25th June. We were thrilled that the composer himself was able to attend to see us perform the parts of Jesus, Pilate and the Evangelist quartet, with Owain conducting the soloists and instrumentalists alongside Stephen Layton and the Holst Singers in this remarkable setting of the Passion story. It truly was a very special evening for all involved!


Alexander Chance on our performance at Raynham Hall

Early in June we made a trip past Cambridge on to King’s Lynn, and thence into the depths of the gorgeous sun-soaked Norfolk countryside, to Raynham Hall. This is the home of Lord and Lady Townshend, who host an annual summer concert series in its stunning marble Great Hall. We had been invited to perform by the series’ musical advisor, Michael Chance.

After a delicious lunch, we had a chance to test and delight in the concert hall’s marvellous acoustic for several hours, before our important pre-concert ritual of garden cricket, featuring, in a testament to the depths of the Townshends’ cupboards, the rare luxury of actual stumps and bails.

The concert programme itself seemed a fitting one for a sultry May evening – Italian madrigals by Monteverdi and Gesualdo, as well as lesser-known but equally joyous works by their contemporaries Gastoldi, Anerio and Giovanelli. We sang to a greatly appreciative audience, who had travelled from all corners of this glorious and often under-visited county (where I lived with my family for ten years); the packed room did nothing to dampen the acoustic. We are immensely grateful to the Townshends for hosting us so warmly and generously, and we hope to return in the future.

Spring Season

We are looking forward to a busy spring season, with our first performances in the North of England as well as in The Hague and at the Wye Valley Music Festival. We are also recording our first CD of English Renaissance Polyphony, before appearing at the inaugural Holy Week Festival at St John’s Smith Square, in partnership with Tenebrae.

Performance Dates

– 22 March: REMA European Day of Early Music in The Hague | Website

–  26 March at 3pm in Monmouth Priory Church | Website

–  30 March at 6.30pm in Kingston Parish Church | Tickets available by emailing Linda Rimmer

–  31 March at 6.30pm in Blackburn Cathedral (featuring the Cathedral Choristers) | Tickets

–  1 April at 5pm in Victoria Hall, Bolton (concert and workshop for Bolton Choirs Festival) | Tickets

–  2 April at 7pm in St Ann’s Church, Manchester | Tickets

–  10 April at 6pm in St John’s Smith Square (part of the Holy Week Festival) | Website

G6 Northern Tour 2017 Poster

Northern Tour 2017

St Anne's Manchester.jpgWe are delighted to be performing our first concerts in the North of England, taking place in Blackburn, Bolton and Manchester 31 March – 2 April.

“The coolest vocal group around – revel in the gorgeous sounds, the spellbinding music, the programmes with something for everyone. Don’t miss them, I guarantee you’ll have the best evening ever.” – John Rutter

– – –

DATES

–  Friday 31 March at 6.30pm in Blackburn Cathedral. Featuring the Cathedral Choristers in a joint performance of Allegri’s stunning Miserere mei, Deus | Tickets (£8/Free under-18s)

–  Saturday 1 April at 5pm in Victoria Hall, Bolton. Concert and workshop for Bolton Choirs Festival | Tickets (£6/Free under-18s)

–  Sunday 2 April at 7pm in St Ann’s Church, Manchester. Featuring a work by local composer Douglas Mason as well as folksong and light music arrangements  | Tickets (£8/Free under-18s)

– – –

ABOUT THE GROUP

The Gesualdo Six are a vocal consort directed by Owain Park. Formed in March 2014, the ensemble has since gone on to perform numerous concerts around the UK, including two summer tours.

Whilst focusing on early music, the group often programmes modern works, including pieces by Joanna Marsh, Sarah Rimkus and Paweł Łukaszewski in their recent concerts.

The group were St John’s Smith Square Young Artists 2015-2016, following a highly competitive audition process. The scheme invests in promising artists who show “enormous talent and energy”, endeavouring to help shape their futures.

The group’s first recording will be an album of English renaissance polyphony, due for release in late 2017.

– – –

Click here for Facebook Events

– – –

 

We are looking for some sponsorship with this venture. Read more in a blog post from Owain here: http://thinknowltd.com/guest-blog-owain-park-director-of-the-gesualdo-six/

Joseph on returning to Salisbury

Joseph Wicks – tenor Joseph Wicks - The Gesualdo Six (Leicester)

“I for one am hugely looking forward to returning home to Salisbury with the group for several reasons. Firstly, it will be a joy to give a concert once again at St Martin’s, a church in which I gave many a school concert, occasionally practised the organ and regularly visit to hear other local musicians perform. Secondly, we will also be singing to the children and staff of the cathedral school during their weekly assembly in the cathedral itself. This will not only be a magical moment for the ensemble to perform in such an iconic, vast and wonderful building, but will also be a magical moment for me, to sing to the current pupils of my alma mater! For a school to meet each week in Salisbury Cathedral is a privilege, and I’m so pleased that we are able to sing to the school.”

The Gesualdo Six perform in St Martin’s Church, Salisbury, on 9 December 2016 at 7.30pm. Tickets are available in advance from Eventbrite (click here).

Find out more about our Christmas Tour here.